Pope’s visit to Cuba coincides with the 50th anniversary of Fidel Castro’s Excommunication

Via the Latin American Herald Tribune:

Pope Prepares for Cuba Visit 50 Years After Fidel’s Excommunication

VATICAN CITY – This week’s 50th anniversary of Pope John XXIII’s excommunication of Cuban leader Fidel Castro coincides with preparations for a visit to the Communist-ruled island by the current pontiff, Benedict XVI.

Castro was excommunicated a month and a day after his Dec. 2, 1961, speech proclaiming himself a Marxist-Leninist and announcing his plans to lead Cuba to communism.

John XXIII supported that measure in the 1949 decree of Pope Pius XII, which established the penalty of excommunication for anyone spreading communism.

The revolution headed by Castro had already proclaimed itself “socialist,” and later the state declared itself to be “atheist” up until 1992 when that designation was replaced in the Cuban Constitution by the word “secular.”

Benedict XVI will travel in March to Mexico and Cuba on his second visit to Latin America after a 2007 excursion to Brazil.

President Raul Castro, Fidel’s younger brother, said a few weeks ago that Cuba would welcome Benedict XVI with “affection and respect” on a visit coinciding with the 400th anniversary of the finding of the image of the Virgen de la Caridad del Cobre, the island’s patron saint.

10 thoughts on “Pope’s visit to Cuba coincides with the 50th anniversary of Fidel Castro’s Excommunication”

  1. Ortega gave a mass for the recovery of Castro when he was gravely ill. Can mass be given for someone who’s been excommunicated?

  2. No prob. The Pope may even revoke the excommunication. It seems logical the way things have been going for Fidel so far.
    What a world.

  3. I’ a faithful Catholic and I must say I am appalled at the sad state my Church is today, especially at the top level.

    Then I should not be surprised at all as the Jews were being exterminated during WWII how little did the Pope stood up to Adolf Hitler.

    For some reason I cannot understand my Church wants to be in bed with the Devil and we all are going to pay the price.

  4. Honey, the way things are going, not only may the excommunication be revoked, castro might even be canonized!

    The Catholic Church is a thoroughly corrupt institution. I was watching a fascinating History Channel Documentary last night about Martin Luther. They say that the pope under which Martin Luther rebelled was so corrupt that he would have lavish parties where little naked boys would jump out of enormous cakes! He spent so much money on these lavish parties and on building St. Peter’s Basilica that he started selling indulgences to replenish the Vatican coffers that he depleted. This is what pushed the fanatically pious Luther to write the bull that he hammered on the cathedral door and the rest is history. The church is its own worst enemy.

    By the way, why is it that I can’t get out of my mind, images of Cardinal Ortega and Raul giving similar parties with cakes and dancing boys?

  5. “By the way, why is it that I can’t get out of my mind, images of Cardinal Ortega and Raul giving similar parties with cakes and dancing boys?”

    You may be on to something, lol…

  6. “the way things are going, not only may the excommunication be revoked, castro might even be canonized!”

    Yes, I can only imagine, St. Cagastro, patron saint of the colostomy bags…

  7. I don’t know how these things work, and I expect most Catholics don’t, either, but it may be that Fidel’s excommunication was quietly rescinded, possibly years ago, especially after the official 1992 change of Cuba from atheist to “secular” state. If not, how could John Paul II make a formal visit to Castro’s Cuba and/or receive Fidel in the Vatican, which he also did? How could Cardinal Bertone, the Vatican’s Secretary of State, be so chummy with the Castro leadership on his visit to Cuba? How could Ortega offer a mass for Fidel’s recovery and, in effect, for his potential return to power as Cuba’s acting head of state? I mean, there have to be rules about these sorts of actions or gestures if they involve someone who’s been formally expelled from the Catholic fold. Maybe some Belén boys can clarify the matter through their Jesuit connections.

  8. As I understand it, Fidel was excommunicated based on a papal bull that prescribed excommunication for those promoting and spreading communism. Obviously, he never stopped doing that, and definitely never repented having done it, so I don’t see how the excommunication could be legitimately rescinded. However, “irregularities” are hardly unheard of. Ortega became cardinal in 1994, and I can easily see him lobbying for the excommunication to be lifted, albeit privately, to improve church-state relations.

Comments are closed.