Cuban pitcher who recently defected sued by Cuban American

Aroldis Chapman, the left-handed pitching phenom who recently defected from Cuba and signed a multi-million dollar contract with the Cincinnati Reds, is being sued by a Cuban American for allegedly reporting him to Cuban State Security, which led to a prison sentence when they both lived on the island.

Via The Spokesman-Review:

Cuban-American files lawsuit against Reds’ Chapman

http://media.spokesman.com/photos/2012/05/23/spt_23_chapman_bb_notes_t210.jpg?74a72ef94756bccc16ea1c78066b52f96b62dbc7A major league pitcher who defected from Cuba has been sued for $18 million by a Cuban-American man who blames the player for his imprisonment on the communist island.

The lawsuit was filed last week in Miami federal court against Aroldis Chapman, a left-handed pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds. The lawsuit claims that Chapman falsely accused Danilo Curbelo Garcia of involvement in human trafficking, leading to his 2008 arrest and conviction in Cuba. Curbelo Garcia is serving a 10-year sentence.

Chapman defected in 2009 in the Netherlands and was signed a year later by the Reds to a six-year, $30.25 million contract. The lawsuit claims Chapman accused Curbelo Garcia to win favor with the Cuban government so he could rejoin its national baseball team and eventually travel overseas to stage his escape. Chapman had been suspended from the team for a previous attempt to flee Cuba.

“His decision to leave the country led to his methodical subterfuge, which centered on demonstrating his loyalty to the state, which he accomplished by becoming an informant … and falsely reporting and testifying against Curbelo Garcia,” the lawsuit says.

The lawsuit was filed in South Florida because Chapman owns a home in the area and Curbelo Garcia’s wife and daughter both live there.

Continue reading HERE.

2 thoughts on “Cuban pitcher who recently defected sued by Cuban American”

  1. How would U.S. law have jurisdiction over what happened in another country before these two individuals even entered this country?

  2. Even then, what reciprocity agreements can there even exist between Cuba and the United States to honor claims concerning incidents outside each country’s direct jurisdiction? If there were, wouldn’t there be even more claims and lawsuits against former snitches who have since ‘escaped’ and taken refuge to live here in Miami and throughout these United States?

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