When will power be restored in South Florida?

That’s the question of the day for the hundreds of thousands who remain without power.

Here’s an update via CBS Miami:

FPL Making Progress In Powering Up Miami-Dade & Broward

As of 9 a.m., 484,160 customers in Broward and 645,150 in Miami-Dade were without power.

Dozens upon dozens of FPL trucks were seen at the staging area at Gulfstream Park as workers embarked on a mission to restore power.

“We have a restoration workforce of more than 19,000 personnel from 30 different states and they’re all working throughout our service territory trying to restore power,” said Florida Power & Light spokesman Richard Gibbs.

Although FPL says they don’t have a timeline as to when you can expect to have your power back on, if you live near a hospital, a police station or a fire station you can expect to have your power back on sooner rather than later because those places have priority.

And from FPL:

Alert: We estimate we will have restored power to essentially all of our customers along the east coast service territory by the end of this coming weekend, and for customers along our west coast service territory by the end of day, Sept. 22, with the possible exception of areas impacted by tornadoes, severe flooding and other pockets of severe damage.

Communication systems across Florida were impacted by Irma, causing issues with our reporting systems. We apologize if you were provided incorrect status updates. We ask that you please re-report your outage if your power is still out.
Alert: We estimate we will have restored power to essentially all of our customers along the east coast service territory by the end of this coming weekend, and for customers along our west coast service territory by the end of day, Sept. 22, with the possible exception of areas impacted by tornadoes, severe flooding and other pockets of severe damage.

1 thought on “When will power be restored in South Florida?”

  1. As happened with Wilma, a lot of the outages are due to power line damage which could have been avoided if the lines had been properly monitored and maintained to make sure they were free and clear. That is FPL’s job and responsibility, but obviously that did not happen as it should have. Now, those affected have to suck it up, and they can’t even have the satisfaction of leaving FPL because there’s no other provider–and by the way, just as after Wilma, I fully expect FPL to ask for (and get) a rate increase to compensate for the expense of restoration work after the storm. Talk about adding insult to injury.

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