UPDATED: A Che stamp? So? Get over it.

http://irishpost.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/che-stamp-f.jpg
Image: Irish Post

The stamp was issued on Monday, October 9, to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Beret Boy getting a definitive taste of his own medicine. The fact it would be issued may well have been announced before that date (according to the Irish Ministry of Communications, the design for the stamp was approved by the Dublin government back in 2015).

Evidently, at least somebody in Miami, Ninoska Pérez Castellón, found out immediately–the Irish Times story with her reaction to this outrage is dated October 9, and that story was linked on this blog the next day, October 10. The Broward County Sun-Sentinel was a little slow to pick up the story, which it ran on October 11.

So what about the Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald?

As I write today, October 12, I can find no coverage of this story in either Miami paper, which strikes me as exceedingly, uh, curious. One assumes the Herald people are aware of the matter, which happens to be their job, and regardless of how they feel about it, there’s unquestionably a very interested market for it in South Florida.

So what gives? Passive-aggressive behavior? Lassitude? Boredom? Inquiring minds want to know.

UPDATE: 10/13/2017:

So today, Friday, October 13, El Nuevo Herald finally runs a bland little AFP story on the damn stamp, which chiefly says it’s selling like hotcakes in Ireland, and completely ignores any response by “those people.” Oh, yeah, like I’m ever going to spend a penny on this worse-than-useless rag. Lord have mercy.

AFP, by the way, stands for Agence France-Presse, which is based in Paris and is the third largest news agency in the world after the AP and Reuters. Apparently, the Nuevo Herald people couldn’t be bothered to generate their own story, and of course what readers in South Florida want is the French or European take on this matter. Absolutely unbelievable. Or not–and there’s the rub.

6 thoughts on “UPDATED: A Che stamp? So? Get over it.”

  1. So today, Friday, October 13, El Nuevo Herald finally runs a bland little AFP story on the damn stamp, which chiefly says it’s selling like hotcakes in Ireland, and completely ignores any response by “those people.” Oh, yeah, like I’m ever going to spend a penny on this worse-than-useless rag. Lord have mercy.

  2. AFP, by the way, stands for Agence France-Presse, which is based in Paris and is the third largest news agency in the world after the AP and Reuters. Apparently, the Nuevo Herald people couldn’t be bothered to generate their own story, and of course what readers in South Florida want is the French or European take on this matter. Absolutely unbelievable. Or not–and there’s the rub.

  3. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen knew about the Che stamp before it was released, She tweeted this on October 7:

    “Ireland glorifying the murderous Che Guevara on its stamps is a grotesque insult to the many lives he slaughtered.”

    The Irish press, the BBC and FOX News have all reported on the obviously negative Cuban exile reaction. The Miami Herald, however, which operates in the heart of the Cuban exile community, appears uninterested in the whole thing and, as far as I can find, has so far ignored it. Maybe it’s trying to keep the Chihuahuas from yapping–after all, you know how “those people” are.

  4. UPDATE (sort of):

    Although this blog has covered the Che stamp story considerably better than the Miami Herald would have, meaning we don’t actually need Herald coverage (or the Herald, for that matter), the fact such a story has been ignored completely by the chief newspaper in Miami seems rather telling.

    Obviously, the story is of significant interest to the very sizeable Cuban-American community in the area served (it’s a figure of speech) by the paper in question, so why the apparent blackout? Is the Miami Herald really so indolent and blasé that it can’t even bring itself to run a second-hand account from another news source, at least for the sake of pretending it gives a shit? That’s what El Nuevo Herald finally did, several days late, which comes across as throwing a measly bone to “those people” whose English is not so good. My English, however, is just fine, and so is my capacity to do the math.

    Lord, the disgust.

  5. Genealogy note:

    Che’s Irish ancestry consists of one man from Galway, Patrick Lynch, born in 1715, who emigrated first to Spain and from there to what is now Argentina (where he conveniently married a local heiress). He was Che’s great-great-great-great-grandfather, so Che was 1/64 Irish, which is less than 2%. Obviously, such paltry ancestry is not the reason for this stamp, but merely a pretext, and a very weak one. The Irish behind this vileness simply like the idea of having Che as a “countryman” because they like him for what he was, or what they think he was, and they want to make a public show of that association, flimsy as it is. We’re talking despicably amoral and incredibly shallow cretins, if not worse.

  6. Well, the Irish Che stamp story is now old news and the Miami Herald didn’t cover it, which clearly implies it didn’t find it newsworthy. Or something. In Miami. Is this great journalism or what? So responsive to its public, too. Unless, of course, its Cuban readership has dropped to a point where that sector of the public is no longer an issue, or much less of an issue than other sectors to whom the story would be insignificant. To be fair, the Herald, in either language, hasn’t seen a penny of my money in ages, so I can hardly expect it to cater to me, but I had thought it still had a sizeable Cuban-American audience. Maybe that’s not the case.

    Oh, and the crappy little story that El Nuevo Herald borrowed from AFP and ran four days late was in a section of the paper titled Curiosidades, or “curiosities,” the same section where it puts stories like some woman in Texas having multiple surgeries to look like Melania Trump. I guess, you know, a stamp honoring Che Guevara might as well be a joke, no? Lord have mercy.

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