The collapse of education in Castro’s Cuba

Roberto Alvarez Quiñones in Diario de Cuba:

Education, the flagship that sank

http://www.diariodecuba.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/large/image/estudiantes160218iii.JPG

Ideology aside, Cuba did have a good educational system, between the 60s and the late 80s, by Third World standards. A network of schools was built across the island that raised the population’s base educational level, and allowed for the training of tens of thousands of university professionals.

Fidel Castro made everyone believe that this was possible due to the superiority of the Communist model he had implanted. Free and massive education, as a “genuine achievement of the Revolution,” together with public health, constituted the flagship with which the strongman sold the world a great political-ideological product. It was so successful, in fact, that 27 years after collapsing everywhere, people continue to praise education in Cuba.

The truth is that everything was a facade, and devoid of noble purposes. The commander gave himself the credit, but it was Uncle Boris of the Kremlin who was picking up the bills, with subsidies of 3 to 5 billion dollars per year. The unproductive “revolutionary” economy was incapable of sustaining those massive outlays, far beyond what it could afford.

Cuba received some 115 billion dollars from the Soviet Union between 1960 and 1991. But Castro did not invest it in the economic development of the country to guarantee education and all social expenditures in a sustainable and indigenous way, but rather to project the appearance, for dictatorial reasons, that Cuba could compete with the world’s developed nations and, above all, to feed his megalomaniacal ego.

Meanwhile, the Caribbean pharaoh intervened militarily in Angola, Ethiopia, Somalia, Namibia, Congo, Syria (against Israel), Algeria (against Morocco), Panama, Dominican Republic, Nicaragua and Venezuela.

He also created, trained, armed and assisted rural and urban guerrillas and terrorist groups in Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala and Haiti. He fancied himself a leader of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries and “Redeemer” of the Third World. How much did all this cost?

Brainwashing and control

Castro’s true purpose in mass education was never altruistic, as the propaganda purported. His goal was to pull off the biggest act of brainwashing in the history of the Americas, to sow in children, adolescents, young people and all the people a sweetened vision of socialism and its dictatorship, and project a deceptive version of history, the world, society and humanity.

Education as an “achievement of the Revolution” allowed the commander to shore up his power. His image as a benefactor and social philanthropist for his people and the poor of the world nourished the cult of the Cuban revolution worldwide.

Since all schools were nationalized, the new “revolutionary” teaching set about instilling a contempt for the values ??of western culture, democracy and the freedoms of the modern citizen. And to glorify the dictator and his circle.

That’s why today in Cuba almost no one is shocked by the fact that anyone caught with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in his pocket goes to jail for carrying “enemy propaganda.” Nor are they surprised when children and teenagers shout at dissidents: “Down with human rights!” These aberrations are cultivated in Castro’s schools, at every level.

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1 thought on “The collapse of education in Castro’s Cuba”

  1. So what’s wrong with those girls in the photo? Why aren’t they working harder at attracting old European tourists looking for cheap fresh meat? Why aren’t they being at least as, uh, suggestive as those much younger kids we saw a couple of years ago? You know, these kids:

    https://babalublog.com/2016/04/14/most-uplifting-video-of-the-month-kids-twerking-for-the-revolution/

    I mean, these girls need to get their asses in gear and sell the merchandise, ’cause the revolution isn’t paying for itself, and they need to do their revolutionary duty. What do they think they are, anyway? Muchachitas bien criadas y de buena familia? That bourgeois shit is dead and gone. Memo to Mariela: Get these girls sexed up more so they can make themselves useful, because aquí lo que cuenta es el ca$h–and we’re definitely talking foreign currency.

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