U.S. airlines jump at chance to take over unprofitable and abandoned routes to apartheid Cuba

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The long-awaited airline routes to apartheid Cuba opened up by President Obama’s surrender to the murderous Castro dictatorship received plenty of fanfare. Once they went into operation, however, U.S. airlines came to the realization that a vacation in a communist island hellhole run by a brutally repressive apartheid regime was not as popular with the American public as they anticipated. Soon after, airlines began reducing and dropping their flights to Cuba, with some airlines abandoning them altogether.

Nevertheless, it appears some U.S. airlines want to expand their trips to apartheid Cuba and are jumping at the opportunity to lose more money.

Via USA Today:

DOT awards Cuba flights to American, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest and United airlines

The Transportation Department tentatively approved Friday four daily and six weekly flights between the U.S. and Havana, after airlines applied for slots that rivals had surrendered.

The proposed allocation calls for:

?American Airlines and Delta Air Lines to each get a daily flight from Miami. American had proposed to use Boeing 737-800 aircraft with 160 seats. Delta proposed to use Airbus A320 aircraft with 160 seats.

?Southwest Airlines to get a daily flight from Fort Lauderdale. The airline proposed to use either a 737-700 with 143 seats or a 737-800 with 175 seats.

?JetBlue Airways to get a Sunday-through-Friday flight from Fort Lauderdale and a Saturday flight from Boston. JetBlue proposed to use Airbus A320 planes with 162 seats.

?United Airlines and Mesa Airlines to share flights Sunday through Friday from Houston. United planned to use 737-800 planes with 154 seats and Mesa, operating as United Express, planned to use Embraer 175 aircraft with 76 seats, “as economic conditions warrant,” according to the proposal.

United already provided weekly Saturday flights from Houston to Havana.

“On behalf of United Airlines, we applaud the U.S. Department of Transportation’s decision to increase United service between Houston and Havana from Saturday-only to daily,” Steve Morrissey, United’s vice president of regulatory and policy, said Friday.

Applicants have 15 days to file objections to the distribution before the decisions become final.

The Obama administration restored flights to Cuba as part of a reopening of diplomatic relations for the first time in more than 50 years with the island 90 miles from Florida.

The Transportation Department set a limit of 20 daily round-trips to Havana, with more flights to other cities, when it reopened scheduled passenger service in February 2016.

The competition to serve the Caribbean destination was fierce, and all Havana slots were allocated by August 2016. But since then, with a weak market and diplomatic tensions, several airlines dropped out.

Continue reading HERE.

7 thoughts on “U.S. airlines jump at chance to take over unprofitable and abandoned routes to apartheid Cuba”

  1. Well, you know what the principal and most dependable target audience is, don’t you? And if these airlines find the profits they’re after, you know from whose pockets they’ll be coming, right? Vamos bien.

  2. Perhaps, the people who made that infamous cake (which must have cost a pretty penny and didn’t come from just any bakery) were so far removed from Cuba’s history and reality that they simply took the standard elements of Castroite propaganda for tourists and used them indiscriminately, as in mindlessly. However, there are other far less “innocent” possibilities, and I tend to favor the latter. Lord, the disgust.

    And by the way, somebody in Tampa should make it his or her business to find out, if possible, where the damn cake came from. It might prove, uh, enlightening.

  3. United also offers regular service from Newark to Havana. It used to be Continental before the big merger which disappeared said airline.
    I know of a flight attendant from the Continental days who had Vilma Espín sitting in first class from Newark back to Havana after giving a speech in the United Nations.

  4. United also offers regular service from Newark to Havana. It used to be Continental before the big merger which disappeared said airline.
    I know of a flight attendant from the Continental days who had Vilma Espín sitting in first class from Newark back to Havana after giving a speech in the United Nations.

  5. The Che cake had to come from a bakery that does fancy custom cakes, of which there are several in Tampa, but it may have been flown down from the Boston or New York areas by JetBlue, which is based in that region. Needless to say, a Boston or NYC bakery would be most unlikely to have any qualms about producing such an obscene confection, and would almost certainly have thought nothing of it. Evidently, neither did JetBlue or even the Tampa Airport people, who should have recoiled in horror at the first sight of the thing and refused to go near it for photographs. Alas, even I can still underestimate, at least a little, the depths and extent of the perversity and hijeputez out there.

  6. There is a bakery in MA, presumably in or near Boston, that does work for JetBlue according to its website, but I cannot tell if that’s where this cake was made. It doesn’t really matter, of course; if the customer pays the money, the customer can get a Che cake. What matters is that JetBlue saw nothing wrong with it and, even worse, that the Tampa Airport people did not immediately tell them No way this is going to fly here.

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